All posts by Sergio Sismondo

The new watchdogs of science

—Emmanuel Didier, Catherine Guaspare-Cartron— On March 3rd, 2016, we hosted a conference entitled ‘Destabilized Science’ at the University of California, Los Angeles, to which we invited two representatives of core actors within the new science watchdog pack: Ivan Oransky, co-founder in 2010 of Retraction Watch, and Brandon Stell, co-founder in 2012 of PubPeer. After the … Continue reading The new watchdogs of science

Sticky technologies

—Tom Scott-Smith— It is easy to love fluidity. Fluid movement implies grace and effortless beauty. Fluid materials yield and flow. Fluids fill gaps, change in response to new conditions and are inherently smooth and adaptable. These qualities have seemed particularly useful in development and humanitarian aid. The Zimbabwe bush pump, as described in an article … Continue reading Sticky technologies

What can a self-driving car crash teach us about the politics of machine learning?

—Jack Stilgoe— In May 2016, a Tesla Model S was involved in what could be considered the world’s first self-driving car fatality. In the middle of a sunny afternoon, on a divided highway near Williston, Florida, Joshua Brown, an early adopter and Tesla enthusiast, died at the wheel of his car. The car failed to … Continue reading What can a self-driving car crash teach us about the politics of machine learning?

Brain injury in sport and its effects: Entanglements of science, law, and design

—Kathleen Bachynski, Kate Henne, Matt Ventresca— Traumatic brain injuries and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) featured prominently in one of the three Science, Technology, and Sports sessions at 4S 2017. Recent athlete deaths – some coinciding with pledges by athletes to donate their brains for scientific study – point to embodied consequences of CTE. The issue has … Continue reading Brain injury in sport and its effects: Entanglements of science, law, and design

‘Native American DNA’ and the self-indigenization of French descendants

—Darryl Leroux— Relying on a populace well-educated in family history, a robust national genomics sector has developed in Québec. That development has coincided with a threefold increase in the number of individuals in the region self-identifying with a latent, mixed-race form of indigeneity that runs counter to existing Indigenous understandings of governance and kinship. Genetic … Continue reading ‘Native American DNA’ and the self-indigenization of French descendants