Monthly Archives: April 2018

Tech goes to university

—Alison T. Wynn and Shelley J. Correll— A typical recruiting session (a composite of many observed) You walk into the room and you’re immediately greeted by a bubbly female recruiter. ‘Welcome!’ she says enthusiastically. ‘Please sign in and take a raffle ticket. We’ll be auctioning off an iPad! And there’s plenty of food in the … Continue reading Tech goes to university

Authoritarianism and Indigenous peoples in the development of forensic genetic technologies

— Mark Munsterhjelm — A powerful new class of forensic genetic technologies being adapted by security agencies, called next generation sequencing (NGS) or massively parallel sequencing, have been sharply criticized by a number of scholars for resurrecting once discredited racial categories (Duster, 2015; Fullwiley, 2014). We might see NGS technologies in other terms, as well: … Continue reading Authoritarianism and Indigenous peoples in the development of forensic genetic technologies

Sensibilities of the flesh

— Nicole Charles — In an interview with a well-known Barbadian pediatrician about parents’ hesitancy toward the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, Dr. Jones (a pseudonym) said to me: ‘I think after a while, people will come to their senses, do what’s best and protect [their children].’ But for Bernadette (also a pseudonym), a 39-year-old Afro-Barbadian mother … Continue reading Sensibilities of the flesh

Sensory STS: A blog-post series

— Co-editors: Nicole Charles, Marianne de Laet, Jia-Hui Lee, Christy Spackman — A reviewer of one of our recent papers bluntly stated, ‘Instruments don’t sense.’ ‘Don’t they?’, we wondered, perplexed, visions of pH meters, spectrometers, and disease-sniffing rats dancing through our heads. The reviewer’s statement in turn opened a world of questions: What does it mean … Continue reading Sensory STS: A blog-post series